Thursday, October 24, 2013

Artist Spotlight: Elynne Rosenfeld

Spirit Abundance, 30" x 40",
acrylic and glass beads
"My work exists to connect with others in contemplation, affirmation, peace and spirit. It is there to help any and all who wish to engage in its energy. It is not static, but invites interaction. Changing with the light, it moves through various conditions imparting different messages at different times. It's purpose is to remind us of what is too huge to fathom and too miniscule to see." ~Elynne Rosenfeld
Closeup of Spirit Abundance

Pennsylvania artist, Elynne Rosenfeld, creates majestic mixed media paintings, with a very unique combination of materials.  From her own artistic journey and personal experience, Elynne came to jewelry making and took her love of beads into her paintings.  With her natural affinity for detail, Elynne's works invite the viewer into the painting field to experience the piece from different vantage points, up close, and also far away.  Each piece is intricately woven with layers of color and glass, designed precisely to create a subject that flows effortlessly on the canvas.

Elynne began her art studies at Rice, when the fine art program was just beginning.  She had encouraging professors backing her style and talent, and she realized at that young age that she could pursue art as a life calling.  

At the time, she found her niche in acrylics being that they were the primary medium used in undergrad.  Even after some experimentation in oils during and after grad school, she found her way back to acrylics because of their diversity and ever changing technology.  "The medium has come a very long way, with all kinds of gels that produce effects once only possible with oils, and even effects beyond what oil allowed.  I like to build up a surface in my painting, and find it interesting to experiment with the technology as it evolves," she explains.  "Also, the gels facilitate adhestion to canvas," which Elynne uses faithfully adding her glass and bead work.   She also uses interference paint, which changes colors when viewing the work from a different angle.  "The advantage of this is that the resulting pieces are quite interactive in person."  
Bridge, 30" x 40", acrylic and beach glass

Elynne's underpaintings call for larger flats, rounds and filbert brush shapes, which shows as the larger subject seen from a distance.  However, when up close and personal with the work, it is evident that the paintings have incredible detail, layers of tiny spirals.  For this work, Elynne is using small script brushes, sometimes as small as a 10/0.  


Closeup of Bridge
Although Elynne's primary focus is now on abstraction, she has moved throughout the range of subject matter in her career, taking the time to work figuratively and at various levels of abstraction.  "I believe in the essence of things as opposed to the thing itself.  By that I mean that the inherent message in a well done artwork transcends its subject matter.  At times, I am able to express better through abandoning the obvious image," she says.

The advantage to viewing Elynne's work in person is to catch the pieces' movement and interaction, the detail, and the reflective color.  It means to see her talent for the subject matter captured exquisitely in brilliant acrylic and glass.  Right now her work is on exhibit at the Clubhouse at Regatta in Norristown, PA up through November 3rd.  On November 15, for one night only her work will be featured in a fundraising event, "Looking Out For Kids",  at Salus University, Elkins Park, PA to benefit children with eyecare needs.  

To follow Elynne's work online, you can visit her website for current works and news or find her on the Manhattan Arts International website:  manhattanarts.com/Gallery/Elynne-Rosenfeld

Keep Painting, 
Karyn 

For more brush information, check out the Dynasty Brush website.